Category: Coffins

Families are now renting coffins for funerals amid cost of living crisis

Some funeral directors are now offering coffins for rent to cut down the costs for families.

An average funeral runs to thousands of pounds, with coffins a major contributor.

The cheapest wooden coffins on offer by Co-op funerals on their website are £450 for traditional oak, cherry or maple, while their most expensive standard coffin (white rose casket) is £2,650.

Even a cardboard coffin is priced at £450.

With many families struggling with increased costs of electricity and fuel, finding the money to pay for an expensive funeral is an added strain.

The rented coffins are used in the service and even in the burial, but are later removed with the deceased person later being cremated or laid to rest in the simple wood or cardboard liner.

US provider Everplans, which offers rented coffins, says on its website: ‘A rental casket is a casket that has a removable interior. The body is placed in a simple wooden box and the box is placed inside the casket, giving the appearance that the body is actually in the casket.

‘In fact, the body never touches the casket, and the wooden box is easily removed after the service. The body can then be buried or cremated in the simple wooden box, and the funeral home can re-use the rental casket.’

How to decide whether to cremate or bury?

Direct cremation, in particular, is considered less costly since it lowers costs by saving on terrestrial space.

It is a very personal decision made by the individual or family members. In addition to taking into consideration the wishes, feelings and beliefs of the deceased loved one, there is also the fear in some people of being decomposed or buried alive.

Religious and cultural beliefs also play an important role in this decision. With the exception of Orthodox Judaism, the Eastern Orthodox Church and Islam, most religions accept the process of cremation.

In fact, this system has been practiced in Hinduism since time immemorial, believing that not only cremation serves as a means to get rid of the body but also helps the deceased soul on his journey to the next world. The burial ground, on the other hand, symbolizes the burial and resurrection of Christ.

Cremation is also being promoted for social, technological and philosophical reasons. There are concerns about public hygiene due to corpses buried near the surface of the earth.

In addition, technological advancement has led to the creation of modern cremation kits that can help reduce the body to its basic elements. However, there are environmental concerns associated with the emission of gases released during cremations.

Cremation or burial

Cremation reduces the body to cremated remains in a matter of hours, while traditional burial follows a slow and natural decomposition process.

Direct cremations are more cost effective than direct burials, as they do not require embalming. In addition, you have the option of keeping the body in an alternative container instead of a coffin.

Cremation is a simpler process that also helps save floor space, unlike in the case of a burial. However, both are considered safe ways of dealing with the corpse.

As people today live far from their family roots, cremation provides more flexibility in terms of commemoration compared to the method of burying in a graveyard.

The cremated remains can be stored in a cremation urn and displayed on a shelf or mantle at home, scattered in the ground, scattered from the air from an airplane, floating in water, placed in a columbarium, buried in a cemetery or buried in a crypt inside a mausoleum. You can carry with you the cremated remains of the deceased if you move to another city, which is not possible in case of burial.

However, since cremation is an irreversible process, it is essential to decide and be clear if cremation or burial is preferred.

In addition, it must be taken into account that cremation is not a substitute for the funeral since the final disposal of the remains is also required.

Other alternatives are to perform a funeral before cremation or a memorial service later. By choosing cremation, the ashes of the loved one can then be scattered, buried or buried.

What are the Different Types of Coffins?

Traditional Coffin

The British coffin style provides a classic look, modest and traditional.

These are characterised by a flat top, the sarcophagus (coffin shaped) i.e. narrower at the head and toes than at the shoulders and simple fittings. They can be enhanced with raised lids and additional detailing on the side of the coffins called wreaths.

The lids are shallower than European styles but one of the styles we offer has a Double raised lid which gives a similar effect.

The coffins are made using oak veneers, which are laminated on to chipboard or medium density fibreboard (MDF). All are Forest Stewardship Council certified. They are approximately 80-85% wood and 10% Glue and rest moisture. A high proportion of the wood is from recycled wood. It’s pressed together with heat and glue a then a usable board is made, which is used to make our coffins.

The coffins are finished with a water based lacquer not solvent based. When it’s dry it’s completely biodegradable No other toxins are contained within the board, therefore, these coffins are suitable for burial or cremation.

When the coffin is cremated, as it’s mostly wood as the coffin burns it aids the process of cremation without any harmful emissions. The amount of CO2 released from the coffin during cremation is offset by the CO2 taken up during the life as a tree and can be considered carbon neutral.

If you’ re planning on a woodland burial please let us know, so we can use a suitable calico liner which will comply with regulations and be completely biodegradable.

Cardboard Coffin

In recent years cardboard coffins are becoming a very popular option. Seen as eco-friendly, modern and now using modern digital printing can be decorated in high-quality designs as varied as your imagination.

The coffins we supply have no fixings at all and the cardboard are folded in a way that the structure is maintained. The finished item is incredibly strong and can hold considerable weight. Our standard cardboard coffins will support a person of up 23 Stone. If the person is heavier we can do this with special provision, please let us know.

We supply coffins that are traditional coffin shaped (sarcophagus) i.e. narrower at the head and toes than at the shoulders and also Casket (rectangular) shaped – some customers prefer this shape, but this a purely personal choice.

We supply our coffins with strap fabric handles as standard – please let us know if you prefer not to have these.

If you don’t find something on our catalog that you like, please contact us and we can make a design specific to you.

Our fabric coffins have a rigid cardboard structure but then some with a decorated cover called a pall.

Natural Materials Coffin

The products that we don’t make in the UK are either manufactured by co-operative associations or are covered.

In recent years he has been a trend to move to more sustainable and natural material for coffins. They often have a softer look and feel and have no ‘ hard edges’ or corners and our coffins have no metal fixing and often ties and fixing are made with the materials itself. a fair trade agreement ensuring that all workers and suppliers are treated fairly and work in good and safe conditions.

In line with our strong green beliefs, all of our products are manufactured in the most environmentally friendly way. Our products are handmade from local materials grown and cropped in licensed plantations.

American Caskets

These stylish and beautifully made caskets are either made of solid wood or Steel sheet. They come fully finished with quality plush linings and include all fixtures and fittings that embellish the exterior of the caskets.

Most of these are suitable for burial only all these caskets are suitable for repatriation.

These Caskets, made in America by the same well-established manufacturer who provided caskets for John F Kennedy and Michael Jackson.

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