Category: Funeral Ideas

Families are now renting coffins for funerals amid cost of living crisis

Some funeral directors are now offering coffins for rent to cut down the costs for families.

An average funeral runs to thousands of pounds, with coffins a major contributor.

The cheapest wooden coffins on offer by Co-op funerals on their website are £450 for traditional oak, cherry or maple, while their most expensive standard coffin (white rose casket) is £2,650.

Even a cardboard coffin is priced at £450.

With many families struggling with increased costs of electricity and fuel, finding the money to pay for an expensive funeral is an added strain.

The rented coffins are used in the service and even in the burial, but are later removed with the deceased person later being cremated or laid to rest in the simple wood or cardboard liner.

US provider Everplans, which offers rented coffins, says on its website: ‘A rental casket is a casket that has a removable interior. The body is placed in a simple wooden box and the box is placed inside the casket, giving the appearance that the body is actually in the casket.

‘In fact, the body never touches the casket, and the wooden box is easily removed after the service. The body can then be buried or cremated in the simple wooden box, and the funeral home can re-use the rental casket.’

Royal Funerals

Royal funerals are a state affair — but what does it actually mean to handle one?

The last royal funeral in the UK was for Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. He passed away on April 22nd 2021 at age 92 and asked to have a ceremonial rather than stately ceremony because he felt like an ordinary member of society who had served his country well with loyalty until retirement from public life several years ago- not someone special or entitled enough according how most people think about these things anyway!

Royal undertakers are always prepared

The current funeral directors and undertakers to the royal family, Leverton & Sons, overlooked the funerals of Princess Diana, the Queen Mother, and the Duke of Edinburgh.

Chairman Clive Leverton said that “back in 1991, I had a phone call from the Lord Chamberlain’s Office.” He wasn’t approached with a written contract. “It was just a handshake really,” the Guardian previously reported.

Apart from helping to arrange the funeral service, royal undertakers also have responsibilities to plan for a sudden death and keep a special coffin at the ready in case a member of the royal family dies, as reported by Sam Knight in the Guardian.

During the inquest into the death of Diana, Leverton told Jonathan Hough, the counsel to the inquest: “We have some plans for some members of the royal family, and there is an overall operational plan involving repatriation if there is a death abroad — or, say, in Scotland, where road transport would not be practical.”

The pandemic also compelled the royal family to adapt their funeral protocol to England’s third national lockdown. The guest list for Philip’s funeral was cut from 800 to 30 people, with no lying-in-state ceremony for the public.

Royal undertakers have to abide by strict procedures following the death of a sovereign, but changes like these have prompted questions about the flexibility of the traditions that have been inherent to royal funerals.

“We’re 300 years old, but compared to the business of being the royal family in the state of the UK, it’s really nothing,” Field said. “They’re kind of more constrained around what they can and can’t do with a state funeral.”

Philip’s death also sparked questions around funeral procedures for the Queen.

Codenamed “Operation London Bridge,” current royal undertakers Leverton & Sons have prepared for any emergency scenarios following the Queen’s death, including keeping a “first call coffin” at the ready.

If she dies abroad, a plane called “the Royal Flight” will take off from Northolt, with the coffin from Leverton & Sons, Knight wrote.

Her state funeral would most likely be held at Westminster Abbey, and would include a procession in London and Windsor and a nationwide two minutes’ silence at midday, as reported in Elle.

Although many royal funeral traditions have stood the test of time, embracing modernity has become a bigger part of the equation in the last century. Royal funeral directors are now tasked with the challenge of abiding by the monarchy’s protocol, while adapting to any unprecedented changes that are thrown at them.

How to plan the perfect funeral

When a loved one dies, it’s often difficult to know what to do. If you’re not sure where to start, here are some tips on how to plan the perfect funeral. By following these simple steps, you can make the process easier for yourself and your family. First, decide what type of service you want. There are many different options available, so choose the one that best suits your needs. Then, select a burial or cremation site and make arrangements with the funeral home. Finally, gather together any important documents and ensure that the deceased’s estate is in order. Planning a funeral can be challenging, but it’s important to remember that there is no right or wrong way to do it. By taking care of everything ahead of time

  • Plan the funeral in advance
  • Choose a location for the service
  • Find out what will happen during the ceremony
  • Write your eulogy to be read at the funeral
  • Select music that is appropriate for your loved one’s life and personality
  • Send invitations to friends and family members

Planning a funeral is one of the most difficult things someone can do in life. That’s why it’s important to take care of all the details so that loved ones are able to grieve without having prep too much on their plate for this final celebration of love. If you need help with your planning, contact us today! We have experts ready and waiting to help make sure every detail is perfect for your family member or friend who has passed away.

What are the Different Types of Coffins?

Traditional Coffin

The British coffin style provides a classic look, modest and traditional.

These are characterised by a flat top, the sarcophagus (coffin shaped) i.e. narrower at the head and toes than at the shoulders and simple fittings. They can be enhanced with raised lids and additional detailing on the side of the coffins called wreaths.

The lids are shallower than European styles but one of the styles we offer has a Double raised lid which gives a similar effect.

The coffins are made using oak veneers, which are laminated on to chipboard or medium density fibreboard (MDF). All are Forest Stewardship Council certified. They are approximately 80-85% wood and 10% Glue and rest moisture. A high proportion of the wood is from recycled wood. It’s pressed together with heat and glue a then a usable board is made, which is used to make our coffins.

The coffins are finished with a water based lacquer not solvent based. When it’s dry it’s completely biodegradable No other toxins are contained within the board, therefore, these coffins are suitable for burial or cremation.

When the coffin is cremated, as it’s mostly wood as the coffin burns it aids the process of cremation without any harmful emissions. The amount of CO2 released from the coffin during cremation is offset by the CO2 taken up during the life as a tree and can be considered carbon neutral.

If you’ re planning on a woodland burial please let us know, so we can use a suitable calico liner which will comply with regulations and be completely biodegradable.

Cardboard Coffin

In recent years cardboard coffins are becoming a very popular option. Seen as eco-friendly, modern and now using modern digital printing can be decorated in high-quality designs as varied as your imagination.

The coffins we supply have no fixings at all and the cardboard are folded in a way that the structure is maintained. The finished item is incredibly strong and can hold considerable weight. Our standard cardboard coffins will support a person of up 23 Stone. If the person is heavier we can do this with special provision, please let us know.

We supply coffins that are traditional coffin shaped (sarcophagus) i.e. narrower at the head and toes than at the shoulders and also Casket (rectangular) shaped – some customers prefer this shape, but this a purely personal choice.

We supply our coffins with strap fabric handles as standard – please let us know if you prefer not to have these.

If you don’t find something on our catalog that you like, please contact us and we can make a design specific to you.

Our fabric coffins have a rigid cardboard structure but then some with a decorated cover called a pall.

Natural Materials Coffin

The products that we don’t make in the UK are either manufactured by co-operative associations or are covered.

In recent years he has been a trend to move to more sustainable and natural material for coffins. They often have a softer look and feel and have no ‘ hard edges’ or corners and our coffins have no metal fixing and often ties and fixing are made with the materials itself. a fair trade agreement ensuring that all workers and suppliers are treated fairly and work in good and safe conditions.

In line with our strong green beliefs, all of our products are manufactured in the most environmentally friendly way. Our products are handmade from local materials grown and cropped in licensed plantations.

American Caskets

These stylish and beautifully made caskets are either made of solid wood or Steel sheet. They come fully finished with quality plush linings and include all fixtures and fittings that embellish the exterior of the caskets.

Most of these are suitable for burial only all these caskets are suitable for repatriation.

These Caskets, made in America by the same well-established manufacturer who provided caskets for John F Kennedy and Michael Jackson.

Most Popular Funeral Songs

Choosing funeral songs is often seen as an important part of personalising a funeral service for your loved one. It is a chance for you to pay tribute to their personality, their hobbies, or simply say farewell with one of their favourite songs.

Popular funeral songs

Some people choose live music for funerals, commemorating a person’s life with uplifting and happy songs. The choice is completely up to you, and depending on the rules of where the service is being held, there really is no right or wrong.

As funerals become more tailored to reflect the life of the person who has sadly passed away, families are opting for modern songs to be played at the service.

Here are some of the most popular funeral songs:

  • My Way – Frank Sinatra
  • Angels – Robbie Williams
  • The Best – Tina Turner
  • Wind Beneath My Wings – Bette Midler
  • Always Look on the Bright Side of Life – Eric Idle (Monty Python’s ‘Life of Brian’)
  • Time to Say Goodbye – Sarah Brightman and Andrea Bocelli
  • You’ll Never Walk Alone – Gerry and the Pacemakers
  • You Raise Me Up – Westlife
  • See You Again – Wiz Khalifa

Classical funeral music

Classical music remains a popular choice for funerals, setting the stage for an emotional and moving service. Many people opt for light classical music for funerals, whilst others may prefer a more dramatic piece which reflects the personality of their loved one.

Some of the most popular classical music for funerals include:

  • Canon in D – Paachelbel
  • Nimrod from Enigma Variations – Elgar
  • The Four Seasons – Vivaldi
  • Ave Maria – Schubert
  • Pie Jesu – Fauré
  • Adagio – Albinoni
  • Air on a G String – Bach

Creative ideas for a special funeral

Remembering your loved ones in a unique and special way. Buckley Memorials have put a few ideas together to add something unusual and memorable together for the celebration of life.

Choose a personalised casket

People are becoming increasingly creative with coffin and casket choices as a way of celebrating a person’s life and their interests.

Some coffin-makers specialise in colourful and patterned coffins, with a vast range of designs, from flowers, butterflies and stars, to music-themed designs, national flags and animals. Some companies even allow you to custom design a coffin with a specific image.

Another option is choosing a plain coffin and inviting close friends and family members to decorate it with drawings or messages for their loved one. You could use permanent marker pens, paint, crayons or stickers. Some people find that being closely involved in such a way helps them understand the grief they are feeling and say goodbye to their loved one.

Personalise the order of service

Order of service booklets are often handed out at funerals. Most commonly they are quite plain, with perhaps one photograph on the front cover. However, these booklets are another opportunity to personalise the funeral.

The cover could be a collage of many different photographs of the person who has passed away. You might even add captions to each photo to explain where and when it was taken. Not only will this look colourful, it will also serve as a unique keepsake for the mourners to take away. Mourners who are not close friends or family may not have access to photographs of the person who has passed away, so this is a fitting way to share memories of them with everyone in the congregation.

Create a memory board

Use a freestanding noticeboard to create a collage of photographs to display at the funeral and wake. This creates a place for mourners to come together and share memories.

You could expand this idea by providing labels or cards for guests to write on and add to the board. They could leave memories, messages, or even write down their favourite things about the person who has passed away.

After the wake the family can save the photographs and messages in a photo album as a lasting memorial.

Don’t be afraid to be colourful

It is becoming more and more common for people to request ‘anything but black’ for a funeral, whether that’s the dress code, hearse or casket.

You can ask mourners to wear bright colours, or an item of a particular colour, if your loved one had a favourite. Alternatively, you could hand out flowers of their favourite colours at the entrance to the funeral service. These could then be placed onto the coffin before burial or mourners could take them home as a keepsake.

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